Liane Kupferberg Carter Got it Wrong!

Today, when there are so many disrespectful, insensitive and uncaring individuals it is a pleasure to be treated with respect and offers of kindnesses. I take no offense with being called ma’am. Nor am I offended when someone offers me a seat on a crowded bus or subway. I’ve experienced the opposite. It’s not a great feeling being shoved and nearly falling, by someone racing for a seat or standing when your body is practically ready to collapse. You will not get any votes from me in support of a truly disappointing article.

The appropriate response to all kindnesses is always a polite thank you, a kind smile or a polite refusal. If preferring to stand, just say so. Good manners in this day and time when it’s rare goes a long way with me. I was raised from a child to respect my elders, this includes offering a seat to an elder, a pregnant woman or someone obviously in need of a seat. I have no problem offering my seat or
opening a door for others. We help each other, is this not what caring humans do? When kindnesses are extended to me my response is always one of gratitude.
People feel wonderful when a kindness they offered is appreciated. Sometimes, they appear to stand taller. I’m a proud elder who embraces her age with joy, style, energy, vibrancy and grace. It shows in how I walk in the world.

The kindnesses this author speaks of have absolutely nothing to do with ageism and everything to do with respect, being raised with manners and caring for your fellow humanity. I’m grateful I qualify for reduce fare at the movies. Have you seen the price for tickets?I appreciate a restaurant special, reduced transportation fare and all benefits afforded me. There are many us who’ve worked all of our lives, now living on one third of our former incomes. Individuals who welcome this assistance, an assistance which supplements our income. Frankly, I’m disappointed by this lack of gratitude, author vanity and immaturity. Perhaps, this attitude is rooted in an ideology grounded in societal ageism, mythology of aging, obsession with youth and an indoctrinated accepted shame and fear of aging.

You can read the article Don’t Call Me Ma’am in Next Avenue.
http://www.nextavenue.org/how-it-feels-to-be-maamed-ageism/?hide_newsletter=true&utm_source=Next+Avenue+Email

©Lorraine Currelley 2017. All Rights Reserved.